Participant using telehealth in an oncology trial
Blog posts

Simply digital: Trial technologies help reduce oncology’s burden

With the share of oncology trials continuing to increase, the case for using digital tools in these trials grows with it.

Today, cancer trials are the most commonly researched of all diseases, with their share of clinical trials growing each year. According to research from Tufts CSDD,  the number of cancer drugs “has nearly quadrupled since 2000, to 1,489 trials in 2021, up from 421 two decades earlier.”

Tufts CSDD notes that this growth comes as “oncology drug developers are increasingly shifting toward precision medicine, embracing new molecular targets and improvements in genetic sequencing technologies”

Webinars

Bringing empathy into the digital environment

Learn best practices to incorporate empathy and human interaction in the digital environment with attentive listening, building relationships with sites, promoting clinical trial technology implementation, and learning from other industries that have successfully transitioned to digital.

Guides

Back to basics: What is a clinical trial platform?

Modern clinical trials employ various digital-based tools and technologies designed to increase the speed, accuracy, and ease of conducting clinical trials. In the best-case scenario, these tools are housed in the same experience or a  “clinical trial platform.” 

Clinical trial platforms are software-based, web-based, and/or cloud-based solutions that facilitate clinical trial research throughout its entire lifecycle. They offer a complete technology ecosystem that connects patients, research sites, and trial sponsors from patient recruitment to close out and data submission. Users of clinical trial platforms can access and operationalize all of their digital-based tools through this connected platform. Platforms can prevent users from accessing parts of the platform not permitted for them. For instance, participants can not view other participants' data or gain access to tools meant for sites. Other users, like sponsors’ study teams, have access to the full suite of tools as needed based on their roles.

Blog posts

Trends, insights, and news from SCOPE 2024

SCOPE
6 min

With over 3,300 attendees across 850 companies, the 16th annual Summit for Clinical Operations Executives (SCOPE) was a huge success. As previous years have shown, what’s big at SCOPE tends to be big for our industry. Thus, we’re summarizing some key takeaways from this year’s conference to understand where the industry may be headed next.

Blog posts

You asked, we answered: How to Create Your own Multimedia Library for Informed Consent

An often quoted analogy for recruitment into clinical trials is that of the ‘leaky pipe’. In this analogy  potential participants drop out of the recruitment funnel at every stage in the process from identification, pre-screening, consenting, screening, randomisation and trial completion. 

Research in 2020 [1]  showed that of 100 participants identified for pre-screening, only 8 will be randomized, and only 7 will complete the trial. Given that  a recent review with the Medable Patient Champion Network (PCN) highlighted that the paper consent process was often considered as ‘intimidating’, the fact that up to 80% [2] of potential participants are lost during the consent process is not surprising. Metrics such as these highlight the importance of being able to provide a potential participant with the details of a clinical trial in a manner that both engages and educates them. This helps ensure that their very first experience with the trial, and at times the research facility, sets the tone for a positive trial experience. 

Once enrolled into a clinical trial, the process of educating a participant and ensuring the consent form is understood, has a direct impact on their retention. Research from CISCRP [3] showed that 35% of participants that dropped out early from a clinical trial found the consent form difficult to understand, compared to only 16% of participants that completed their clinical trial.

White Papers, Case Studies, Reports

ePROs: Transforming oncology trial research

ePRO
6 min

Over the last decade the number of oncology trials has skyrocketed, almost doubling the number of all other therapeutic areas combined, according to the WIRB-Copernicus Group¹. Known for their complex design, oncology trials often present various participant, site, and sponsor hurdles.

Sponsors and CROs looking to tackle these challenges andreduce the burden on participants and sites should explore the potential of digital solutions, particularly electronic informed consent (eConsent) and electronic patient reported outcomes (ePRO). Both tools offer expanded views of the participant journey while offering feedback that enables sponsors and CROs to enhance and refine their trials for all stakeholders.

White Papers, Case Studies, Reports

The Definitive Guide to Digital Evidence Generation

According to Grandview Research, the hybrid and decentralized clinical trial (DCT) market will be worth more than 12 billion dollars by 2030. Sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020, the rapid ascent of patient-centered technology and the digital and decentralized trials they’ve spawned has forever changed the landscape of clinical conduct. Sponsors are increasingly turning to DCT platforms in alignment with the rise of Life Science and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solutions. For those who haven't made the jump yet, there are many questions, including "What is a decentralized clinical trial?" Find out with this in-depth guide to decentralized clinical trials. Uncover how they work, their benefits, and how they transform clinical development.

Guides

Back to Basics: What is a decentralized clinical trial?

In a decentralized clinical trial, part or all of the protocol occurs away from the primary study site. Instead of patients traveling, often repeatedly, to a central site for enrollment, consent, data collection or symptom monitoring, they can participate in telehealth visits from their homes, often using familiar technologies, like smartphones, tablets and wearables to transmit pertinent information. Even medications and devices can increasingly be delivered directly to a patient’s home, and a home visit from a health care professional can be arranged if necessary. 

Guides

Back to basics: What is electronic informed consent (eConsent)

While informed consent form (ICF) signatures traditionally have been collected on paper at a physical site, today’s digital approach — electronic consent (eConsent) — offers more than high-tech signature collection. It provides an upgrade to patient education and communication as well, empowering participants in new ways. Moreover, eConsent can democratize clinical trial access, allowing researchers to recruit broader and more diverse participant groups through entirely remote consenting processes. This broader and less burdensome access also can increase the speed of recruitment and reduce drop-out rates.

Webinars

What it really takes to adopt eConsent across large pharma

Learn about the benefits of adopting consent management technology and best practices around developing change management and training programs to help sponsors, CROs and sites get the most out of eConsent.

Webinars

ePROs: Transforming oncology research

eCOA
6 min

In this webinar, VP of Digital Trial Solutions Musaddiq Khan, VP of Product Strategy Colin Weller, and Cancer Survivor Lindsey Matt discuss how Medable is supporting a patient-first approach in complex Oncology clinical trials

Webinars

Digital vs digitized: Common myths about eConsent for clinical trials

Alex Burrington, CTI Principal of Vertex, and Andrew Mckinnon, VP, GM of eConsent discuss common myths around eConsent, how to improve comprehension with patient-centric consent, and how to use a digital consent management tool to improve trial compliance, quality, and oversight.

See how Medable can make your trials more efficient.